Trini Fruits

Trinidad is rich in its natural resoruces and fruits are one of them. Here are some Trini Fruits that I can remember eating as a child. You can also find some of these fruits in the other Caribbean Islands but most likely they would be know by different names.

Along with each image of the Trini Fruits, I have listed a little description next to most of them. This is an on going project. As I get more images of Trini Fruit with descriptions, I will list them.

five fingers

Five Fingers

Julie Mango

Julie Mango

Lady Nose Mango

Lady Nose Mango

Sapodilla

Sapodilla

Sapodilla

Sapodilla

Balata

Balata

 

Cashew

Cashew

 

Cocoa

Cocoa

 

Fat Pork

Fat Pork

Governor Plum

Governor Plum

Sour Series

Sour Series

Pommecythere aka Golden Apple

Pommecythere aka Golden Apple

peewah

Peewah

pommerac

Pommerac

chennette

Chennette

 

Guava

Guava

coconut

Coconut

sugar apple

sugar apple

tamarind

Tamarind

Tippy Tamboo

Tippy Tamboo


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sapodilla is round in shape and has a reddish brown skin. When ripe, the fleshy pulp may be eaten or used to make custard and ice-cream. The early Indians chewed the rubbery sap of the tree, which they called ‘chicle’.
Five Fingers aka Star Fruit. The very ripe fruit has a golden yellow colour; half-ripe its a lemon green and unripe they are very green, all can be eaten. It also has a variety of tastes when eaten raw. The fruit is sweet, watery, slightly acid and pleasant
to taste. Five Fingers is also referred to as the “Star Fruit” . When the fruit is cut across it has a striking  star shape, hence the reason for the name. The skin of the fruit is thin and somewhat waxy and there’s no need to peel the fruit, although the outer edge of the ribs may be removed if they are bruised.

The cashew nut grows externally in its own kidney shaped hard shell at the end of this stem commonly known as cashew fruit or cashew apple. The cashew apple is the yellowish-orange part that’s attached to the fruit. When ripe, the fruit turns a bright reddish orange color. It leaves a sort of tangy taste in the mouth.

Chataigne. This fruit looks very similar to Breadfruit in its natural form, the only different is that the skin of the Chataigne has a pickery surface while the skin of the Breadfruit is smooth. The skin of both these fruits are vivid green in color. Once the fruit is cut open, the inside has a white pulp and inside the pulp are brown seeds. These seeds are called the Bread Nut and they are to be separated from the pulp. When the Bread Nut are cooked, they can be eaten.

Golden Apple. “Pomsite is the creole (patois) adaption of the french term “pomme de cythere” or simply pommecythere”. Pommecythere can eaten green or ripe. The pommecythere surely refers to its golden nectary pulp when it is ripe or its delicious distinctive fragrance. The fruit has a spiny seed. In Trinidad, it is plentiful throughout the year and is enjoyed in peppery chows (when the fruit is green), in juices when it is ripe, or curried like a chutney.

Coconuts.  Described as the ‘Tree of Heaven’, the coconut is so named because almost every part of the crop, from the roots, to the bark, to the fruit, is of some economic value. Throughout the Caribbean, coconut water is a preferred thirst quencher, while the ‘milk’ and ‘meat’ are used in preparing tasty dishes and pastries.

2 Responses to Trini Fruits

  1. Robin Ray April 29, 2017 at 9:41 am #

    When i lived in Mayaro I used to climb a tree and eat the galbats there. What are those slightly bitter, gauva-sized black skinned fruits also commonly known as?

    • WhaToCook April 29, 2017 at 6:04 pm #

      I haven’t the slight idea! Maybe you can enlighten me!

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